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tutorial:blocks

Adding a Block

Introduction

To add a block to your mod, you will need to register a new instance of the Block class. For more control over your block, you can create a custom block class that extends Block. We'll also look at adding a block model.

Creating a Block

To start, create an instance of Block in your main mod class. Block's constructor uses the FabricBlockSettings builder to set up basic properties of the block, such as hardness and resistance, as you can see here:

public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer
{
    // an instance of our new block
    public static final Block EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new Block(FabricBlockSettings.of(Material.METAL).build());
    [...]
}

Registering a Block

When adding most things to the game, you will need to register it. You can call Registry.register to do this; the first parameter is the registry type, the second is the identifier for your registered subject, and the final is usually an instance of what you are registering.

public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer
{
    // block creation
    […]
    
    @Override
    public void onInitialize()
    {
        Registry.register(Registry.BLOCK, new Identifier("my-mod", "example_block"), EXAMPLE_BLOCK);
    }
}

Your block will not be accessible as an item, but it can be seen in-game by using /setblock ~ ~ ~ modid:name.

Registering a BlockItem

In most cases, you want to be able to place your block using an item. To do this, you need to register a corresponding BlockItem in the item registry. You can do this by registering an instance of BlockItem under Registry.ITEM. The registry name of the item should usually be the same as the registry name of the block.

public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer
{
    // block creation
    […]
    
    @Override
    public void onInitialize()
    {
        // block registration
        [...]
        
        Registry.register(Registry.ITEM, new Identifier("my-mod", "example_block"), new BlockItem(EXAMPLE_BLOCK, new Item.Settings().itemGroup(ItemGroup.MISC)));
    }
}

Giving your block a model

As you probably have noticed, the block is simply a purple and black checkerboard pattern in-game. This is Minecraft's way of showing you that the block has no model. Modeling a block is a little bit more difficult than modeling an item. You will need three files: A blockstate file, a block model file, and an item model file if the block has a BlockItem. Textures are also required if you don't use vanilla ones. The files should be located here:

Blockstate: src/main/resources/assets/my-mod/blockstates/example_block.json
Block Model: src/main/resources/assets/my-mod/models/block/example_block.json
Item Model: src/main/resources/assets/my-mod/models/item/example_block.json
Block Texture: src/main/resources/assets/my-mod/textures/block/example_block.png

The blockstate file determines which model that the block should use depending on it's blockstate. As our block has only one state, the file is a simple as this:

{
  "variants": {
    "": { "model": "my-mod:block/example_block" }
  }
}  

The block model file defines the shape and texture of your block. We will use block/cube_all, which will allow us to easily set the same texture on all sides of the block.

{
  "parent": "block/cube_all",
  "textures": {
    "all": "my-mod:block/example_block"
  }
}

In most cases you want the block to look the same in hand. To do this, you can make an item file that inherits from the block model file:

{
  "parent": "my-mod:block/example_block"
}

Load up Minecraft and your block should finally have a texture!

Creating a Block class

When creating a simple decorational block the above approch works well, but sometimes you want to create something more advanced and will therefore need a custom Block class. We will call it ExampleBlock. The class needs a constructor that takes in a BlockSettings argument.

public class ExampleBlock extends Block
{
    public ExampleBlock(Settings settings)
    {
        super(settings);
    }
}

Here in the your custom block class you can customize your blocks in many ways, for example make you block function like a door or be transparent. That is what we will do now.

 @Environment(EnvType.CLIENT)
 public BlockRenderLayer getRenderLayer() {
     return BlockRenderLayer.TRANSLUCENT;
 }

To add this block into the game you have to replace new Block with new ExampleBlock when you create the block.

public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer
{
    // an instance of our new item
    public static final ExampleBlock EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new ExampleBlock(Block.Settings.of(Material.STONE));
    [...]
}

Your custom block should now be transparent if you have followed the tutorial correctly and use a transparent texture.

tutorial/blocks.txt · Last modified: 2019/03/19 00:22 by draylar